Crown & Bridge Consent


You have been recommended crown(s) and or bridge(s) because your teeth/tooth:

  • Has a crack in it
  • Has a large filling or a filling that is failing
  • Has had or needs root canal treatment
  • Is worn down
  • Is broken down

Or, to replace missing teeth for a bridge.

A crack in the tooth can spread and cause the tooth to break. The best time to crown a cracked tooth is before the tooth develops any symptoms like pain. If a cracked tooth develops symptoms a crown can still stop the crack from getting worse, however the crown may not cure the symptoms in every case and the tooth may still need root canal treatment or an extraction.

A large filling that is failing cannot be fixed predictably with another filling because of the lack of tooth structure for the filling to hold onto.

A tooth that has had a root canal becomes brittle and can crack under biting forces. This is especially true of back teeth/molars.

A crown/bridge procedure is at least 2 appointments. The first appointment will take much more time as this is when most of the work is done. The tooth structure is reduced and an impression is taken.

After this, a temporary crown/bridge is made. The impression is then sent to the lab for the fabrication of the crown/bridge. At the second appointment, the crown/bridge is cemented in.

A crown/bridge can be either gold or ceramic. Gold is the most compatible material with your teeth, but is not white.

After the procedure is started or completed:

  • The tooth may become sensitive or existing sensitivity can become worse. This may indicate that the tooth needs a root canal. If root canal treatment is needed after the crown is cemented, a hole must be made through the crown or the crown may need to be replaced.
  • Your bite may be altered. We may need to make minor changes to the surface of the crown or of the opposing teeth to bring the bite as close as possible to where we want it to be. Sometimes this can cause the bite to "feel off"
  • At the second appointment, the "fitting" appointment, the crown may not fit accurately. If this is the case a new impression must be done and the crown sent back to the lab to make a new crown or modify the existing crown.
  • A crown can last many years, but this depends greatly on your hygiene, diet etc. Most insurance companies will pay for a new crown every 5 years.
  • Sometimes we need to change the treatment plan during treatment. This could be due to a crack not being visible on the x-rays or the decay being worse than expected. In this case the tooth may need to be extracted.
  • It is important that you wear your night guard after a crown has been inserted, if you grind your teeth.

Even when care and diligence is exercised in the treatment of conditions requiring crowns and bridgework and fabrication of the same, there are no promises or guarantees of anticipated results or the length of time the crown and/or fixed bridgework will last. I agree to assume the risks associated with crowns and/or fixed bridgework.


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